Auston Chase Apartment Homes

59 Summerlake Circle, Ridgeland, SC 29936
Auston Chase Apartment Homes Phone Number Call: 833-292-0330 Auston Chase Apartment Homes Email Address Email UsAustonChase001@myLTSMail.com Auston Chase Apartment Homes Google Map View Map
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Opens: Monday-Friday: 9A-6P | Saturday: 10A-5P | Sunday: 1P-5P

$930-$1,495

Apartment Homes Bluffton SC

Reasons You May Want to Keep Renting - Ridgeland, SC

Reasons You May Want to Keep Renting - Ridgeland, SC

Joseph Coupal - Thursday, September 29, 2016

A home purchase is a serious investment of your time and money, so if you're at all hesitant, it may be best to wait. Here are a few questions to ask yourself as you consider whether you're ready to leave your rental.

Are you enjoying the luxury amenities in your apartment community? It's far more common for apartment buildings to offer a variety of amenities and services -- from pools and gyms to package delivery and pickup -- than in previous decades. If you enjoy those amenities and would miss them living elsewhere, you might as well continue taking advantage of them.

They're not the kind of ratty apartment [that buyers are] coming out of where they're happy to be in a home. They're already in a pretty nice place now, and it's sometimes hard for them to find a home that has those features.

Are you ready to make a big investment? Purchasing a home is the biggest investment many people will make in their lifetime. If you're not ready to make such a significant decision, it may be best to remain a renter.

How long do you plan to stay in the next place you live? Investing in a home requires a few years to prove profitable. This gives you time to build equity in the home and for the property to appreciate in value.

A person in his or her 20s may be particularly apt to relocate for a variety of reasons: Career and romantic opportunities have pushed most people to relocate at least once or twice.

Will your home needs change in the next few years? Even if you're ready to settle in one place now, you should take your future needs into account. If you can see yourself starting a family within three years and wanting to live in the suburbs, the one-bedroom condo you can afford now may not be ideal.

For more information on renting apartments in Beaufort, SC, contact Auston Chase.

#HowYouLive
Yahoo! Finance


Rent or Own: Questions to Ask When Deciding– Ridgeland, SC

Rent or Own: Questions to Ask When Deciding– Ridgeland, SC

Joseph Coupal - Thursday, September 22, 2016

The American dream of owning a home is powerful and prevalent, but that dream doesn’t always make good sense in the light of day. When deciding whether to rent or buy, you’ll want to keep your eyes open and your feet on the ground so you can make decisions that are right for you and your family. Here are 6 things to keep in mind:

1. Crunch the numbers. Buying vs. renting isn’t solely about comparing costs, but that’s still a huge part of the process.

2. Know the market. If you don’t know the difference between a “buyer’s market” and a “seller’s market,” now’s the time to educate yourself. Is low inventory driving prices up and making buyers more competitive? Or is there a glut of homes for sale, giving buyers more leeway to cut deals? In either case, how is the rental market responding? Are home prices trending up or down (i.e., will the places you’re looking at likely be worth more or less in five or ten years)? You can’t predict the future, but you should look at current trends and make informed decisions based on what’s happening now.

3. Itemize your costs. The financial difference between renting and owning is much more than simply the upfront difference in price between paying rent vs. mortgage. Don’t forget to account for property taxes, homeowners insurance, HOA fees, maintenance, and repairs/renovations. (If the fridge stops working, you can’t just call your landlord; you will need either fix-it skills and a can-do attitude or money to hire a pro.)

4. Get real about job stability. One major consideration of the “to buy or not to buy” question is whether homeownership makes sense with your job. Can you count on maintaining at least the same level of income in the years you plan to own the home? Will your job allow you to stay in the same city or state for more than a few years at a time? Will you lose income if you choose to stay home with children? If your career is subject to change, don’t discount the benefit of renting a place that’s easy to leave if you need to relocate or reduce expenses on short notice.

5. Consider the kids. Many people decide to buy homes specifically to accommodate building a family. Questions to ask yourself include: Can you afford to live somewhere with schools that meet your needs? Is there room for not just your current family but also any family members that might join you in the future? If you will have to move in 5 years or less, buying may not be a good idea.

6. Search your heart. Do you even want to own a home? Or do you think it’s just what you should want? If owning a home and all that comes with it -- the good and the bad -- isn’t something you’re excited about, don’t sweep that feeling under the rug. Owning a home can be awesome, but it’s not for everyone. You do you.

For more information on renting apartments in Ridgeland, SC, contact Auston Chase.

#HowYouLive

cafemom.com


Millennials are Waiting to Buy Homes – Apartments in Ridgeland, SC

Millennials are Waiting to Buy Homes – Apartments in Ridgeland, SC

Joseph Coupal - Thursday, September 15, 2016

The American Bankers Association Foundation recommends considering the following questions when considering to rent or buy a home:

1. How much money do you have saved up?

Down payments are typically 5 to 20 percent of the price of the home.

Security deposits on rentals are usually about one month of rent or more if you have a pet.

Whatever you decide, keep enough in savings for an emergency-three to six months of living expenses.

2. How much debt do you have?

Take into account your current and expected financial obligations (i.e. car payment, insurance, credit card debt & student loans).

  • Ensure you will be able to make all the payments in addition to the cost of your new home.
  • Keep total rent or mortgage payments plus utilities less than 25-30 percent of your gross monthly income.

3. How long will you stay?

The longer you plan to live someplace, the more it makes sense to buy.

  • Over time, you can build equity in your home.

Renters have greater flexibility to move and fewer maintenance costs.

4. What is your credit score?

A high credit score indicates strong creditworthiness.

A low credit score can keep you from qualifying for the rental you want or a low interest rate on your mortgage loan.

5. Have you factored in all the costs?

Create a hypothetical budget for your new home.

  • Find the average cost of utilities, gas, electricity, water and cable.
  • Will you have to pay for parking or trash pickup?
  • If you're planning to buy a home, factor in real estate taxes, mortgage insurance and possibly a home owner association fee.

6. Location, location, location.

Consider this: For every $1 a family saves on housing in an area that is more affordable, they spend $0.77 cents more in transportation.

Think carefully about your commute and how much household income will be required to meet both housing and transportation costs.

For more information on apartments in Ridgeland, SC contact Auston Chase.

#HowYouLive
illinoishomepage.net


Should You Downsize in Retirement – Ridgeland, SC

Should You Downsize in Retirement – Ridgeland, SC

Joseph Coupal - Thursday, September 08, 2016

One method for freeing home equity for other uses is to downsize your home as a part of moving. Downsizing could mean either moving to a smaller home, or moving into a similar-sized home in a less expensive community.

The arithmetic is fairly basic. If you’ve paid off your mortgage and live in a $300,000 home, and then sell it and move into a $200,000 home, then $100,000 of your home equity has been freed for other uses.

Another possibility is simply to sell your home and then rent an apartment in Ridgeland, SC. Renting frees up home equity and provides more options and flexibility to make more frequent moves before settling down.

When analyzing the decision to rent or buy, you’ll need to consider factors such as the loss of build-up in home equity and its subsequent growth (or loss) and savings on property taxes and other types of home maintenance.

As a part of downsizing, you could consider moving to an apartment community which may be less expensive because of the amenities offered and provide organized activities and social support.

For more information on apartments in Ridgeland, SC, contact Auston Chase Apartments.

#HowYouLive
Excerpts - Forbes


Renter’s Insurance: Don’t Risk Losing Everything – Ridgeland, SC

Renter’s Insurance: Don’t Risk Losing Everything – Ridgeland, SC

Joseph Coupal - Thursday, September 01, 2016

If you were at risk of losing $5,000, $10,000 or even $15,000 and could do something to stop it, would you? The answer is a no-brainer: you’d would.

Yet, more than half of adults ages 23 to 29 years old who rent apartments don’t have renters insurance, putting all their stuff at risk.

Homeowners buy homeowner’s insurance to cover their home and belongings. Those who live in apartments in Ridgeland, SC should get renters insurance to do the same thing. A renter’s policy will cover your personal possessions (clothes, electronics, furniture, etc.) if they’re stolen and will pay to repair or replace them if there’s a fire, burst pipe or other unfortunate event. Renter’s policies can also pay for you to rent a new home or stay in a hotel in if you are displaced by a fire or other natural disaster — coverage that most policies refer to as “loss of use.”

Like homeowner’s insurance, renter’s insurance includes liability coverage – if someone is injured in your home, the cost of their care and potential legal proceedings is covered up to your policy’s liability limits, which is typically $100,000.

But unlike a homeowner’s policy that covers the home structure and its contents, renter’s insurance covers just the contents of your home. That makes it a lot cheaper. Your landlord has an insurance policy that covers the building, but that does nothing to protect your valuables.

Most people don’t have the cash sitting around to replace all their stuff. So why do so few buy renters’ insurance? One reason: while homeowner’s insurance is almost always required if you are paying for your home with a mortgage, there are no blanket laws requiring that you purchase a renter’s policy.

Another  reason: A lot of people are under the misconception that if they live in an apartment that their landlord is responsible for their belongings.

In fact, of the 59% of adults ages 23 to 29 who do not have renter’s insurance, 46% didn’t think they needed it. Another third said they thought it was too expensive and a quarter said they just hadn’t gotten around to purchasing it.

The average millennial carries $45,000 in debt, and it is thought that for that reason as well as other societal trends, they’re delaying a lot of life moments like marriage and home-buying. That means they’re going to rent longer.

Another reason younger renters don’t immediately think to insure their stuff is that they underestimate the value of their possessions. Once they do the math they’re shocked by the full value of what they own.

Think you can’t afford renter’s insurance? You can. The average cost of renter’s insurance is $20 per month — equal to the cost of ordering takeout one night. What you pay for a renter’s insurance is largely based on the value of your belongings.

All renters policies should cover your belongings in your apartment and up to 100 feet from your apartment — to include damage or theft while you’re moving. Policies will cover your items whether or not you’re home at the time of the vandalism, fire, burst pipe or other disaster that ruined your belongings.

#HowYouLive

Forbes



Auston Chase Apartment Homes

59 Summerlake Circle, Ridgeland, SC 29936

Auston Chase Apartment Homes Phone Number Call: 833-292-0330
Auston Chase Apartment Homes Email Address Email UsAustonChase001@myLTSMail.com
Auston Chase Apartment Homes Google Map View Map
Auston Chase Apartment Homes Facebook Auston Chase Apartment Homes Twitter Auston Chase Apartment Homes Google+ Auston Chase Apartment Homes Instagram Auston Chase Apartment Homes RSS Feed
Opens: Monday-Friday: 9A-6P | Saturday: 10A-5P | Sunday: 1P-5P

$930-$1,495