Auston Chase Apartment Homes

59 Summerlake Circle, Ridgeland, SC 29936
Auston Chase Apartment Homes Phone Number Call: 833-292-0330 Auston Chase Apartment Homes Email Address Email UsAustonChase001@myLTSMail.com Auston Chase Apartment Homes Google Map View Map
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Opens: Monday-Friday: 9A-6P | Saturday: 10A-5P | Sunday: 1P-5P

$930-$1,495

Apartment Homes Bluffton SC

Young Professionals Are Choosing to Rent – Ridgeland, SC

Young Professionals Are Choosing to Rent – Ridgeland, SC

Joseph Coupal - Thursday, December 29, 2016

Auston Chase Apartments, Ridgeland, SCHome ownership has reached a five-decade low due in part to the fact that millennials have historically low ownership rates compared to other generations at that age.

Home ownership has always been a part of the American dream. So why aren’t more millennials willing to purchase a place to call home? Should they purchase homes or is it smarter for them to rent? There are several factors to consider.

The Relocation Factor

After the housing crash of 2007, many millennials began to realize home ownership may not be quite the American dream as it has long been touted by realtors and organizations who encourage home ownership.

In fact, home-buying may not be a good idea for the vast majority of millennials – at least not right now.

Not only does it represent a huge financial risk, but it ties you down to a specific area – which may not be very convenient if a higher paying job which required relocation came calling.

For those who want to focus on establishing their careers, some experts highly recommend renting.

Another expert doesn’t think there is a “correct” answer, it depends on each millennial’s individual circumstances. However.

How long do you plan on staying in the area or in this particular home?  Except in rare cases where you’d be buying into a rapidly appreciating market, or you’re renovating a total fixer-upper, if you don’t plan on staying more than a minimum of 2-3 years, it probably makes more sense for you to rent.

The Debt Factor

While some millennials may not want to purchase a home, many simply are not able to because of debt. Lingering debt and financial worries play a critical role in the home-buying decision.

“Despite millennials’ well-publicized low rate of homeownership, our index found 76 percent feel being able to save for a home remains important to achieving an ideal home life – but only 37 percent feel satisfied in their ability to save.

Any millennials who are thinking about purchasing a home will need to understand and then start building their credit score so they can qualify for a mortgage when the time comes.

Perceived job security is another contributing factor. And financially speaking, one needs ample money for a down payment, pre-paid items at a closing like property taxes, and also insurance and renovations.

Even if you have a stable income, your home shouldn’t eat up all of your money.

If it would take every penny of your savings to make a down payment on a home, and you’re not certain of your ability to replenish that in the future, you may want to factor that into your decision.

There are many loan programs out there that can help first-time home buyers with down payment assistance, or that don’t require a severed arm and leg in order to get a mortgage. But millennials should also consider their comfort level with the final estimate.

A home is a huge purchase and demands substantial responsibility in terms of monthly payments and ongoing upkeep, so it’s important to be realistic when it comes to assessing whether you can and should purchase a home.

For more information on apartments in Ridgeland, SC contact Auston Chase.

#HowYouLive
goodcall.com


Happy Holidays from Auston Chase Apartments in Ridgeland, SC

Happy Holidays from Auston Chase Apartments in Ridgeland, SC

Joseph Coupal - Wednesday, December 21, 2016

Auston Chase Apartments in Ridgeland, SCIt is once again "end-of-year" blog post reflection time.  If you are reading this blog post, you care enough about us and our business to invest a minute or two reading here.  That means a lot to us.  The primary reason for this blog is to educate and inform our readers; as an ongoing act of giving thanks for the privilege of earning your continued trust and continued professional partnerships. So we're glad you're here.

We reflect today on the blessings that so many of you bring to both our personal and professional lives. Over the course of 2016, we hope that we have made a difference in many personal and professional lives. This is the true essence and a key measure of professional reward and business success.

It is our sincere wish that all of you bask in the joy of reflection and within the warm confines of family and friends throughout this Holiday season and throughout 2017. Cheers!

Happy Holidays!

-from all of us here at Auston Chase Apartments in Ridgeland, SC

#HowYouLive


Retirees: Rent or Own? - Ridgeland, SC

Retirees: Rent or Own? - Ridgeland, SC

Joseph Coupal - Friday, December 16, 2016

Rent or own? It’s a question many young adults face as they try to find the right balance between their housing needs and financial situations.

These days, many older homeowners are grappling with it, too.

Home-sales data and anecdotal evidence suggest that more baby boomers are putting for-sale signs on their homes this year, seeking to unlock the equity they have regained since the housing

The median age of home sellers has risen to 54 from 46 since 2009, an indication that empty nesters who were waiting for a housing-market recovery are starting to list their properties.

Of course, planting a for-sale sign in the yard raises the question, “Where to next?” And for baby boomers—especially those with oversize houses and inadequate savings—it is a decision that could have a major impact on how they fare financially in retirement.

Unlocking equity

Although investors have been told for years not to think of their primary homes as investments, having a healthy chunk of home equity can make a big difference when it comes to planning retirement finances.

If retirement savings present the risk of a shortfall, one of the best things you can do is liquidate real-estate assets. That’s more palatable than hearing you need to keep working until you’re 72.

It is important for older consumers to consider their needs not just for the next few decades, but for the final one-third of retirement.

We know that the boomers haven’t saved enough for retirement. What they do have is equity in their homes; but do they know how to spend it? Most of them haven’t thought about the last five to seven years of their retirement, which will be the most expensive.

Asset or albatross?

Renting has advantages for older consumers. On the plus side, renters typically enjoy a wider range of housing options, flexibility (a one-year lease is a short-term commitment) and the fact that building managers handle repairs, landscaping and snow shoveling.

If a rental starts out at 30% to 40% below the prior mortgage payment, it may be worth considering. But seniors not spend more than 15% of their annual retirement income on housing—rented or owned—because as the years progress, medical expenses typically rise. (Other financial planners say seniors should spend no more than 25% on housing, and less if they own a home outright.)

The goal is to find a home that is simpler. They want a home that gives them more freedom—maybe it has no yard, or a smaller footprint.

For more information on renting in Ridgeland, SC contact Auston Chase.

#HowYouLive
Wall Street Journal


What to Consider When Choosing Where to Retire - Ridgeland, SC

What to Consider When Choosing Where to Retire - Ridgeland, SC

Joseph Coupal - Thursday, December 08, 2016

Auston Chase Apartmernts, Ridgeland, SCYou may be focused on being near an awesome golf course, but your health and happiness will rely more on these key factors.

1.Housing

Housing is the biggest factor in most Americans’ budgets, by far. In retirement, especially, if you can eliminate a mortgage payment or rent, you can keep your housing costs from changing while your income is fixed.

Renting in retirement is tempting, and for good reason: In many markets, renting still is cheaper than buying a home

Renting buys retirees the flexibility to move on a whim. It’s a more carefree life, with no expense or labor for home and yard upkeep. Leaky faucet? Just call the landlady. Let her deal with it.

Median rents rose more than 6 percent from 2007 to 2015. Increases may slow and prices may even stagnate, as after the Great Recession. But to be safe, renters should be ready for increases in costs.

2. Entertainment

“Best-of” lists of places to retire typically focus on college towns with an abundance of cultural opportunities, including cheap and free concerts, plays, lectures and visual arts. All great. But what if you care more about browsing flea markets? Or rooting for a major league sports team? First-run movies? Jazz clubs? Whatever is your thing, this is your time, so make sure your new hometown will deliver when it comes to your unique interests.

3. Employers

Employers? Sound crazy? Once, perhaps. But today most of us probably get it: Retirement often isn’t permanent. A 2015 survey found that 54 percent of workers age 60 and older planned to work part- or full-time after retirement.

Many Americans, in fact, cycle in and out of retirement. Some retirees grow bored and want stimulation from work. Others learn that their retirement income doesn’t stretch as far as they’d hoped. Or they lost savings or home equity in the recession. You, too, may want to work again after being retired for a while — and you won’t want to move to find it.

In addition to all that, a town with plenty of living wage jobs is a healthy, livable town with a strong economy — the best kind of place to live.

4. Excellent medical care

It’s self-evident, but it’s worth saying: Older people consume more medical care. And they often require care from specialists and facilities specializing in, for example, orthopedic care and geriatric care (and doctors who’ll take your insurance). Find out if your destination has what you need by talking with people and calling providers.

5. Proximity to your family

Being near family when you retire isn’t crucial, and it isn’t for everybody. But even if you don’t mind not seeing family members for extended periods of time, think about the fact that your children or loved ones may one day need to take an active role in your care, perhaps even becoming your caregivers. Great distances make caregiving stressful and often agonizingly difficult for adult children who are also raising families and working.

6. Public transportation

Younger retirees don’t usually give a thought to the availability of transportation. They’re accustomed to hopping into cars and going where they wish, when they wish. But that independence and freedom rarely lasts forever. If you intend to stay in a new community as you age, you may eventually want to use buses, trains, light rail, cabs and ride-sharing companies. Assure yourself, long before you need it, that your new town has plenty of ways to get around.

7. Assisted living, retirement homes and elder co-housing

It’s not a bad idea to pay attention to the availability of long-term care nearby. Nearly 70 percent of people who are 65 and older will eventually develop disabilities and 35 percent will spend time in a nursing home. A little basic research on the front end can help you make sure it’s a good one.

8. Social life

Talk with people you meet to gather a sense of how friendly the community is. If you are looking for a faith community, investigate the congregations that might appeal to you and attend services at several to test the waters. Ask yourself where and how you will make friends. Shop the grocery stores at a couple of different times of day and week to see if people are interacting or simply hurrying in and out. Try to pick up a sense of how warm and open to newcomers the town is. Even those who are not social types may be unhappy in an atmosphere that is cold, exclusive or frenetic.

9. Cafes, restaurants and gathering places

Where do people gather in the community you are considering? Try to look at the place with the eyes of someone who has just moved there: Visit the coffee shops, senior center, parks and movie theaters. If you speak a second language, is there a cultural center where you’ll feel at home?

10. Learning

One of the joys of retirement is having the time to learn simply for the fun of it. Make sure you won’t be stuck in a learning desert — and don’t make assumptions, good or bad, without checking into what’s available. If you have dreamed of attending classes and lectures and picking up new skills or honing old ones, find out what’s available. A quilter, for example, would look for a vibrant quilting or fabric store that’s a hub for workshops, classes and group activities. A busy arts center or arts supply store opens the door to classes in painting, drawing, fiber arts and photography. Look for a brick-and-mortar bookstore, a good sign of a community for people who like to read, think and discuss. Drop into the store and ask what’s going on in town, where book talks and lectures are held and how often. Visit a lumber or hardware store, poke around and ask people about woodworking or boat-building classes in town. A visit to the website of the local community college and other schools will give a sense of the classes, clubs and weekend events offered to community members who are not pursuing a degree.

11. In-home care

If you plan on staying in the community, it’s smart to look at resources you may need down the road. Ask realtors and others you meet about the availability of home health care aides. How many agencies are in town? Are their services highly recommended? What is the prevailing wage? Could you afford to pay it if you need help? Maybe it’s prudent to consider a less-affluent community where you could more easily afford home care.

Do you know where you want to live in retirement? For more information on apartments in Ridgeland, SC contact Auston Chase.

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Money Talks News


Renting Your First Apartment in Ridgeland, SC

Renting Your First Apartment in Ridgeland, SC

Joseph Coupal - Thursday, December 01, 2016

Auston Chase apartments, Ridgeland, SCWhen you are moving out on your own, your first home will probably be an apartment. They are generally inexpensive, available, smaller, and are often concentrated in the places where young people most like to live.

Starting the process may seem nerve-wracking at first, especially if you do not know what to expect. A little bit of planning and preparation can go a long way in helping you get into the best apartment for your needs.

Setting a budget

The rule of thumb is that your rent should be no more than 30 percent of your income, ideally more like 20 to 25 percent. Perhaps more important than the percentage is whether you will have enough money left over after paying your rent to cover your other obligations. Consider your costs for transportation, food, insurance, debt payments, and other necessities and calculate how much you can afford to spend on an apartment.

Other costs

As you are looking for apartments within your budget, remember some additional costs that may or may not be included in the rent. The big one is utilities, including electricity, heat, water, and cable. If your rent does not cover these, you may be able to call the utility company with the apartment address to get an estimate of what the recent bill amounts have been for that unit.

Consider other added costs like a garage or parking space and fees for having a pet in your apartment. On the flip side though, make sure also to factor in perks, like a fitness center and pool, which may allow you to skip paying for a separate gym membership.

Signing a lease

You'll need to go through several steps before you sign a lease. The application will include an employment check, calling your personal references, and checking your credit history. If you do not have good credit history or solid employment, the landlord may require you to have a guarantor or co-signer on the lease with you. Your parents are the best candidates for this role.

When you sign a lease, be ready to put down some money. This will include a security deposit, the first month's rent, and sometimes the last month's rent as well. Find out what you need to do to get your security deposit back in full when you move out.

The last major thing to consider is the length of the lease. You are committing to live there for the entire lease term, and it is worth finding out what the penalties are for breaking the lease if you need to move. Some apartments will let you sublet to another tenant to finish out your lease, which can be helpful if you are not confident you'll stay at your current job.

For more information on apartments in Ridgeland, SC contact Auston Chase Apartments.

#HowYouLive
1st Source Bank



Auston Chase Apartment Homes

59 Summerlake Circle, Ridgeland, SC 29936

Auston Chase Apartment Homes Phone Number Call: 833-292-0330
Auston Chase Apartment Homes Email Address Email UsAustonChase001@myLTSMail.com
Auston Chase Apartment Homes Google Map View Map
Auston Chase Apartment Homes Facebook Auston Chase Apartment Homes Twitter Auston Chase Apartment Homes Google+ Auston Chase Apartment Homes Instagram Auston Chase Apartment Homes RSS Feed
Opens: Monday-Friday: 9A-6P | Saturday: 10A-5P | Sunday: 1P-5P

$930-$1,495