Auston Chase Apartment Homes

59 Summerlake Circle, Ridgeland, SC 29936
Auston Chase Apartment Homes Phone Number Call: 888-705-4749 Auston Chase Apartment Homes Email Address Email UsAustonChase001@myLTSMail.com Auston Chase Apartment Homes Google Map View Map
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Opens: Monday-Friday: 9A-6P | Saturday: 10A-5P | Sunday: 1P-5P

$930-$1,495

Apartment Homes Bluffton SC

South Carolina Low Country Popular with Boomers

South Carolina Low Country Popular with Boomers

Joseph Coupal - Wednesday, June 21, 2017

Auston Chase, Ridgeland, Bluffton, SCSouth Carolina has experienced rapid growth in the last 30 years, much of it from retirees seeking a warmer climate and lower cost of living. As more and more baby boomers begin to retire that trend is certain to continue. Retirees have been moving into all parts of the state, the area in the southwest low country, but near Hilton Head has experienced the most explosive growth.

South Carolina's population is growing. Some of that growth is coming from retirees entering the state. Obviously the housing market crash has impacted sales and prices in 55+ and active adult communities in SC, but probably less so than for the housing market in general. For the record, South Carolina has an income tax maximum rate of 7%, people over 65 get some significant exemptions.

Thanks to the great success of Hilton Head Island as a vacation and retirement spot, the entire southwestern area of the state is now a retirement hot bed. Part of the attraction is the many rivers and bays are in the area, making waterfront living possible for many people at somewhat reasonable prices. Here we will take a look at the various areas near Hilton Head.

Bluffton. This is a much nicer town, located on a bluff overlooking the May River. In this old town near the river you can discover art and antique galleries and the Riverfront Pocket Park and Garden. The area is famous for its Bluffton oysters, and in town the oldest continuous oyster-shucking facility in South Carolina is a local attraction. Bluffton also hosts a number of active adult communities, including some huge ones.

Beaufort. Just north of Hilton Head is another classic southern town, Beaufort. Horse-drawn carriages roll along streets in the town’s charming historic district that are overhung with Spanish moss. The area offers a laid back atmosphere that most people find very relaxing. Beaufort has 304 acres of the town designated as a National Historic Landmark. Many active adult communities radiate from town.

Other Towns in the region. The region is dotted with active adult communities to explore. Some of the other small towns in the Southwest Low Country include Laurel Bay, Burton, and Shell Point.

What People Like about this area of SC:

  • Mild winter climate
  • Being near the coast, bays, and rivers
  • Cachet and prestige of Hilton Head
  • Brand new,master-planned developments
  • Outstanding recreation such as golf, tennis, fishing, boating
  • Many of the towns are charming

This part of SC is definitely one of the best retirement regions in the world. For more information on apartments near Bluffton, SC contact Auston Chase.

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topretirements.com


Retiring Around Bluffton, SC

Retiring Around Bluffton, SC

Joseph Coupal - Thursday, June 15, 2017

Auston Chase, Ridgeland, SCBluffton is a small town with a population of about 13,000 (but 37,000 in the area), on the coast of South Carolina just off of Hilton Head Island and near the Georgia border. The town is located on a bluff overlooking the May River in an area long known for tourism. In the old town near the river, residents will discover art and antique galleries and the Riverfront Pocket Park and Garden. The area is famous for its Bluffton oysters, and in town the oldest continuous oyster-shucking facility in South Carolina is a local attraction. Originally the town was confined to 1 square mile, but it has since then annexed over 32,000 acres for future development. The University of South Carolina Beaufort-New River campus was a welcome new addition to this area. Savannah is 18 miles away. Bluffton is located in Duval County.

What is special about Bluffton

• Charming old town on the river • Proximity to Hilton Head Island, Savannah, Beaufort and a short ride to the beautiful city of Charleston • Luxurious golf course communities • A new and rapidly developing area • Milder winters

Who will like retirement in Bluffton

Bluffton attracts a community of people who either want to live in a charming, walkable, old river town or expensive new golfing communities.

Restaurants & Cultural Scene

There are antique stores, art galleries, and museums in Bluffton (such as the Heyward House Historic Center). Nearby Hilton Head Island and Beaufort have cultural opportunities, as does nearby Savannah. The University of South Carolina-Beaufort offers part-time and continuing education opportunities.

Medical facilities

Hilton Head Hospital is 7 miles away and Costal Carolina is 2 miles away. Beaufort Memorial is 25 miles away and Savannah Hospital is 20 miles away. Bluffton has a new Medical Park in Bluffton also.

Transportation

Savannah/Hilton Head International airport (22 Miles); When compared to other communities, Bluffton is very walkable.

For more information on apartments near Bluffton, SC, contact Auston Chase.

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topretirements.com


Apartment Hunting Tips For Renting Your First Apartment

Apartment Hunting Tips For Renting Your First Apartment

Joseph Coupal - Thursday, June 08, 2017

Auston Chase, Ridgeland, SCMoving out of your home for the first time can be a back and forth experience. On one hand, it’s a bit scary and sad at the same time. On the other hand moving out and living your own is an exciting and exhilarating prospect you can’t wait to experience. There’s a lot of emotions riding in this moment of your life.

Then comes apartment renting…

Apartment renting can take you for a spin if you don’t know what you’re doing. To help, here are some tips for the beginner apartment hunter:

First things first, look at your budget. Find out how much you can afford to pay rent every month. Apartment owners can be picky, too. Most prefer that their asking price is no more than 25% of your gross income or 33% of your net income. Depending on your other responsibilities, you might want to spend even less than 25% on rent.

Make a list of things to ask the apartment owner during the inspection. For example, if you have a pet, you might want to make it clear during the inspection if he or she allows pets inside the building. You could also ask which utilities are paid for in the rent, which aren’t. You might also want to consider waving a lease instead of a monthly payment option, but that’s something you’ll have to discuss with the apartment owner personally.

The next step is finding an apartment. Check the newspaper or search online for apartment rentals in your preferred location. Drive around the neighborhood and see if the area is a safe place to live in.

Compile a list of apartments you’re interested in, and then take a day off and call each apartment owner and ask for an inspection. During the inspection, know what to look out for, from mold formations under the sink to the sturdiness of the front door of the apartment.

Don’t casually fill out application forms especially when you’re undecided on the apartment. Some apartment owners charge an non-refundable fee, and you don’t want to pay for this unless you’re absolutely sure you want the apartment.

Reorder your list of apartment from best to worst, and make a decision from there. After all this preparation, it should be much easier decided on an apartment compared to if you haven’t prepared for anything at all.

Moving out for the first time can be a bipolar experience. Reduce the stress of apartment hunting for the first time by following this strategies and tips.

For more information on apartments in Ridgeland, SC contact Auston Chase.

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Good Herald


It Can be Better to Rent, Even When It's Cheaper to Buy

It Can be Better to Rent, Even When It's Cheaper to Buy

Joseph Coupal - Thursday, June 01, 2017

Auston Chase, Ridgeland, SCIf you're wondering whether you're better off financially renting or buying a home, you can easily find an app for that.

Mortgage calculators all let you input the relevant numbers to determine which option makes more economic sense.

But studies and numbers don't always tell the whole story, and the cheapest option in a state isn't always the cheapest option for an individual. You shouldn't buy if it doesn't fit your lifestyle. If it's really important to you to be going on exotic vacations ... it might be better to rent. Renting is also ideal for someone whose life is unsettled or a person who expects to relocate in a short time.

You don't want to buy if you don't plan to stay put for a while. In most markets, it's going to take around five years to offset the cost of buying.

In the short term, buying nearly always costs more. There's the down payment and mortgage closing costs, plus whatever money you spend to customize the house and get it ready for you. Then factor in the regular costs of homeownership, including homeowners insurance, property taxes and repair costs, and that can add up to a big chunk of change in the first few years of owning a home.

It's always more expensive in the short run to own rather than rent.

But if you crunch the numbers and they say buying a home is the right move, should you? Not always. Here are three good reasons not to buy a house, even if the all apps and calculators say you should.

You Don't Want the Responsibility

If you own a home, fixing anything that breaks is your responsibility. That could be an easy and inexpensive fix, such as calling a plumber to repair a leaky toilet, or a complicated and costly repair, such as replacement of the water and sewer lines from your home to the street.

When you buy a house, the first thing you discover is your landlord isn't going to fix the water heater when it breaks. Are you entirely ready for the requirements?

Not only do you need to have the money to make the repairs, you need to have the skill to find and negotiate with contractors and repair people. It's a lot of responsibility. Everyone should not buy a house. there are people who are emotionally not ready for it.

Your Life Plans Are in Flux

Even when buying seems cheaper than renting, you end up spending more if you sell quickly because of the costs of buying and selling. Buying a home then moving six months later to take a new job or get married can be costly.

The "in and out" costs are estimated at 10 percent of the home's value, though that varies by home and location. If appreciation is 3 percent a year, it will take you four years to break even, if you didn't spend any significant money on improvements or repairs.

The Great Recession also was a good reminder that there is no guarantee real estate will rise in value. People who bought or refinanced homes at the peak of the market in 2006 found themselves trapped in homes that were worth less, sometimes much less, than they owed on their mortgages. If they sold, they would have had to pay the lender tens of thousands of dollars.

Houses are selling quickly now in most cities and are expected to continue gaining value in 2017, but that's not always the case. If you invest in the stock market, you can sell your assets and have your cash in a few days. Real estate has a much longer time frame.

People whose lives are uncertain may not want to buy. Owning a home could make it harder to relocate for a better job, engage in long-term travel, care for aging parents out of state or unite with long-distance lover. Think hard about your current lifestyle and how it may evolve in the near future before you sign on the dotted line.

You Won't Have Any Savings After You Buy

People often forget that the down payment and closing costs are just the beginning when you buy a house or condo. Even homes in solid condition need maintenance and repair, from painting to new roofs to new appliances.

Every homeowner has a story, often multiple stories, of air conditioners and furnaces that needed replacing six months after they moved in, burst pipes that flooded the basement and washers that stopped forever in midcycle. Annual home maintenance and repairs easily can run 1 to 4 percent of the cost of the home, according to several real estate websites and Freddie Mac.

Houses are expensive and things break. You need to have a healthy emergency fund and be able to add to it.

Some lenders require homeowners to have savings as a condition of approving their mortgages. Even if your lender doesn't, you don't want to spend your last cent buying a home, especially if you'll be stretching to pay the mortgage, taxes and homeowners insurance.

You don't want to come out of the process of buying without at least three months of savings.

For more information on apartments in Ridgeland, SC, contact Auston Chase.

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Yahoo! Finance


4 Reasons to Rent - Beaufort, SC

4 Reasons to Rent - Beaufort, SC

Joseph Coupal - Friday, May 26, 2017

Auston Chase, Ridgeland, SCBuying a home is part of the American Dream, but that doesn't necessarily mean it's the best choice for you.

For decades, the conventional wisdom has been that buying a house makes much better financial sense than renting one. After all, you'll have to spend a large chunk of your income on housing either way, so doesn't it make more sense to invest that money in something you'll eventually own, rather than simply forking cash over to someone else?

However, a number of factors can make renting a much wiser financial decision than buying. Here are four good reasons why it may be smarter for you to rent instead of buy.

1. You're not staying in the home very long

The sooner you intend to move, the less sense it makes to buy.

If you plan to stay put for less than two years, then buying a house would be a poor investment. In such a sort amount of time, the home likely wouldn't gain enough value to make up for the costs of buying and selling it, like realtor commissions, closing fees, moving expenses, and so on. And don't forget that buying or selling a house is a huge hassle compared to switching from one rental to another.

2. You're in an inflated housing market

Some parts of the country are prohibitively expensive to live in. Coming up with a down payment for a $500,000 house is considerably harder than coming up with a down payment for a $150,000 house. But what makes certain highly desirable urban areas really problematic is that home prices in these areas can be driven steeply upward by the high demand. Not only would you have to pay an inflated price for the house, which makes it harder for you to turn around and sell it for a gain in a few years, but you'd also have to pay far more each month as a homeowner than you would as a renter for the same amount of house.

3. Your income isn't secure

If you're not confident in your job security, then now is not the time to make a huge purchase like a new house.

If you suddenly lose a major source of income, then you may need to cut your housing costs in order to get by. That's a relatively quick and painless process if you're renting; you might pay a fee to end your lease early, but you could move to a cheaper home in a matter of days. If you own your home, then a career crisis could force you to sell your house at a bad time; it may take months to find a buyer, or you might end up selling the house for less than you paid for it.

4. You have no savings

If an emergency savings account is important for a renter, it's absolutely crucial for a homeowner. As a renter, if something goes wrong with the house, you can simply call the landlord, who will have to pay to fix the problem. As a homeowner, all the expense lands squarely on your shoulders. Even if nothing expensive breaks down on you, homeowners have ongoing additional costs such as homeowner's insurance and property taxes.

If you don't budget for such expenses or run short one month, you may end up having to tap into savings to pay for them. And if you don't have a well-funded savings account, you may be forced to turn to credit cards -- and that repair bill will be made even more expensive by interest and possibly fees.

Also don't forget that ponying up a down payment will take a big bite out of your savings. You'll need to make sure you still have a solid emergency fund after you've paid out the down payment and the cost of moving. After all, what's the point of buying home if you'll be too busy fretting about expenses to enjoy it?

For more information on apartments in Beaufort, SC, contact Auston Chase.

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The Motley Fool


Financial Benefits of Renting – Ridgeland, SC

Financial Benefits of Renting – Ridgeland, SC

Joseph Coupal - Friday, May 19, 2017

Auston Chase, Ridgeland, SCRenting rather than owning a home may not be as expensive as many people think.

The prospect of no longer having to pay rent, known as imputed rent, is often cited as a major incentive to owning a home.

However, a financial researcher has argued that many buyers overlook costs included in their rent, such as building insurance and property maintenance.

He believes a failure to properly account for these outgoings can cause householders to overestimate the financial benefits of owning versus renting.

Individual circumstances and market conditions play a big part in determining whether it is smarter to rent or buy, but this research should help households make an informed choice.

The new research provides a step-by-step explanation of how households can objectively compare the costs of renting versus buying a home, while taking their own personal circumstances and macro-economic conditions into account.

In reviewing transaction costs, imputed rental yields, opportunity costs, inflation and the length of time owning a home, the study also shows that – during periods of deflation or zero inflation – people who rent are financially better-off than those who own their home.

Even when economic conditions are favorable, households may need to own their home for between five and 10 years before returns from the rent they are no longer paying are sufficient to compensate for the high transaction costs of buying.

It is often thought that buying a house makes more financial sense in the long run: however, renting is frequently more worthwhile than buying for financially-constrained households, as well as households likely to relocate within 10 years.

As well as a reduced ability to recover transaction costs, households relocating within a few years face a higher risk that medium-term prices will move against them, thus reducing or eliminating their equity, while financially-constrained households face much higher mortgage costs.

The research charts how deflation, or rising interest rates without a corresponding increase in wages, has the potential to impact negatively on homeowners.

For more information on apartments in Ridgeland, SC, contact Auston Chase.

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knowridge.com


Bluffton, SC, One of the Best Places To Retire In South Carolina

Bluffton, SC, One of the Best Places To Retire In South Carolina

Joseph Coupal - Wednesday, May 03, 2017

Auston Chase, Bluffton, Ridgeland, SCWhen it’s time to put away your work shoes for good, there are no better places in the Palmetto State to spend your golden years than these.

South Carolina: land of beaches, lazy days, warm weather, golf, and, of course, the home state of jazz musician Dizzy Gillespie, the epitome of smooth, relaxing music. In short, South Carolina is a retiree’s dream. Obviously, some places in the state are going to be better for retiring than others.

How We Created This Ranking

We know you’ve worked hard, perhaps for most of your life; so now that it’s coming time to (finally!) retire, we’re taking the work out of it for you. We came up with five measurable criteria to pinpoint precisely which places in South Carolina would be the best for your every retirement need:

  • Cost of living (high)
  • Crime rate (low)
  • Weather (average summer temperature and air quality)• Ease of travel (distance to nearest international airport)
  • Retiree amenities per capita (healthcare, adult education, dining, shopping, libraries, arts & entertainment)

#2 Bluffton, SC

Bluffton may be one of the most charming towns we’ve seen, let alone on our list. With its Old Town situated, postcard-like, along the May River, the old Rose Hill Mansion sprawling across the lawn like an advertisement for the state, Jim ‘N Nick’s Bar-B-Q’s ribs… it’s pretty much anyone’s dream, especially for those retirees who have saved up to afford it.

With some of the most retiree amenities per capita, Bluffton living doesn’t exactly come cheap. The cost of living here is nine percent higher than the national average. Of course, in our analysis, this was good news for its ranking. Perhaps not surprisingly, Bluffton had the same weather score in our analysis as its neighbor, Hilton Head Island, tying the two at the top of this criterion. Plus,with just 3,282 crimes per 100,000 people, Bluffton was also one of the 10 safest on our list.

For more information on apartments near Bluffton, SC, contact Auston Chase.

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movoto.com


Is Downsizing For You? – Ridgeland, SC

Is Downsizing For You? – Ridgeland, SC

Joseph Coupal - Thursday, April 27, 2017

Auston Chase, Ridgeland, SCMany retirees downsize their homes, but this decision requires careful consideration of a variety of factors.

As men and women retire or approach retirement age, many opt to downsize their homes. Such a decision can save older adults substantial amounts of money while also liberating them from the hassle of maintaining large homes they no longer need.

Downsizing to smaller homes or apartments is a significant step, one that homeowners should give ample consideration before making their final decisions. The following are a handful of tips to help homeowners determine if downsizing to smaller homes is the right move.

- Get a grip on the real estate market. Downsizing is not solely about money, but it's important that homeowners consider the real estate market before putting their homes up for sale. Speak with a local realtor or your financial advisor about the current state of your real estate market. Downsizing can help homeowners save money on utilities, taxes and mortgage payments, but those savings may be negated if you sell your house in a buyer's market instead of a seller's market. If you think the current market won't get you the price you are hoping for, delay your downsize until the market rebounds.

- Take inventory of what's in your house. Empty nesters often find that their homes are still filled with their children's possessions, even long after those children have entered adulthood and left home. If the storage in your home is dominated by items that belong to your children and not you, then downsizing might be right for you. Tell your children you are thinking of downsizing and invite them over to pick through any items still in your home. Once they have done so and taken what they want, you can host a yard sale, ultimately donating or discarding what you cannot sell. Once all of the items are gone, you may realize that moving into a smaller place is the financially prudent decision.

- Examine your own items as well. Your children's items are likely not the only items taking up space in your home. Take inventory of your own possessions as well, making note of items you can live without and those you want to keep. If the list of items you can live without is extensive, then you probably won't have a problem moving into a smaller home. If you aren't quite ready to say goodbye to many of your possessions, then you might benefit from staying put for a little while longer.

- Consider your retirement lifestyle. If you have already retired or on the verge of retirement and plan to spend lots of time traveling, then downsizing to a smaller home may free up money you can spend on trips. And if you really do see yourself as a silver-haired jetsetter, then you likely won't miss your current home because you won't be home frequently enough to enjoy it. If travel is not high on your retirement to-do list but you have a hobby, such as crafting, restoring classic cars or woodworking, that you hope to turn into a second profession, then you might benefit from staying put and converting your existing space into a workshop.

Many retirees downsize their homes, but this decision requires careful consideration of a variety of factors.

For more information on apartments in Ridgeland, SC contact Auston Chase.

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The Times


Best States to Find a Job – Ridgeland, SC

Best States to Find a Job – Ridgeland, SC

Joseph Coupal - Friday, April 21, 2017

Auston Chase, Ridgeland, SCSome states are adding jobs much faster than others. CNBC knows, because we've been measuring job creation in all 50 states for 10 years in our annual America's Top States for Business study.

Job growth is a key metric in our Economy category, measuring employment increases over the previous 12 months based on seasonally adjusted nonfarm payroll numbers from the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics. That means we've been measuring job growth since June of 2006. Past performance is no guarantee of future results, but these 10 states have been the best places to find a job over the last 10 years.

South Carolina didn't experience the overbuilding that many of its neighbors did during the housing boom, But the overall economic crisis still hit hard-and it hit the state earlier than most. That has made for easier comparisons as the recovery rumbled along, bit SC has also benefited from a surging health-care sector that continues to add jobs.

#10 South Carolina

2006-2016 Job Growth 8.28%
Net jobs added: 156.200
Key industries: Healthcare, manufacturing
10-year Tops States Economy Rank: No. 40

For more information on apartments in Ladson, SC contact Abberly Crossing.

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CNBC


Ask These Questions Before You Buy a Home - Ridgeland, SC

Ask These Questions Before You Buy a Home - Ridgeland, SC

Joseph Coupal - Friday, April 14, 2017

Auston Chase, Ridgeland, SCLandlady ruling your life? No pets allowed? Maybe it’s finally time to take the plunge and call the shots in your own space. But, there are important questions to ask before taking the leap into homeownership.

How long do you stay in one place? If you don't plan on living in the same home for at least five years, then owning is probably not the best choice. You’ll probably lose money in the long run.

And then, of course, there’s always money. How much do you make? Do you have job security? Have you built up savings for a down payment?

Maybe you’re thinking, "Hey! I can totally pay a mortgage. I pay less than that in rent!" But owning a home comes with a lot more than just a monthly payment and some utilities.

Property taxes alone are sure to hit the wallet hard. You calculate this annual cost by multiplying the assessed value of your home by the tax rate in your area. And don’t forget homeowners insurance and maintenance.

And this is AFTER you’ve paid your down payment and closing costs.

Renting may feel like throwing money away on something that’s not yours, but you’re not tied down. Once that lease is up, the sky's the limit. The world is your oyster... you know... something like that. So if the time and money are right, it may be just the moment for you to finally buy the house of your dreams - and have all the cats you want.

OR:

Are you looking to get out of the renting life and jump into homeownership? Sounds like a great idea - and would certainly impress your friends and family. But there are a slew of things any first-time homebuyer should know upfront. There are essential things to consider when you're looking to buying a home, from property taxes to closing costs.

For more information on apartments in Ridgeland, SC, contact Auston Chase.

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Money



Auston Chase Apartment Homes

59 Summerlake Circle, Ridgeland, SC 29936

Auston Chase Apartment Homes Phone Number Call: 888-705-4749
Auston Chase Apartment Homes Email Address Email UsAustonChase001@myLTSMail.com
Auston Chase Apartment Homes Google Map View Map
Auston Chase Apartment Homes Facebook Auston Chase Apartment Homes Twitter Auston Chase Apartment Homes Google+ Auston Chase Apartment Homes Instagram Auston Chase Apartment Homes RSS Feed
Opens: Monday-Friday: 9A-6P | Saturday: 10A-5P | Sunday: 1P-5P

$930-$1,495